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R.O. Systems

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Reverse osmosis water treatment is considered the best way to provide bottled water quality at a fraction of the price. A reverse osmosis system is plumbed into your homes cold water line and also is plumbed into a drain line. Reverse osmosis is very effective in eliminating and reducing a wide variety of water containments.

 

 Removal of Bacteria & Viruses

Although Reverse osmosis membranes will help reduce bacteria and viruses, it is recommended using Ultraviolet Disinfection if there is a known problem with your water supply.

Reduction of Containments:

Sodium

85 - 94%

Lead

95 – 98%

Sulfate

96 - 98%

Arsenic

92 – 96%

Calcium

94 - 98%

Magnesium

94 – 98%

Potassium

85 - 95%

Nickel

96 – 98%

Nitrate

60 –75%

Fluoride

85 - 92%

Iron

94 – 98%

Manganese

94 – 98%

Zinc

95 – 98%

Cadmium

95 – 98%

Mercury

95 – 98%

Barium

95 – 98%

Selenium

94 – 96%

Cyanide

84 – 92%

Phosphate

96 – 98%

Chloride

85 – 92%

 

Typical System Configuration

A typical reverse osmosis system will be set up as shown below. It typically will feature mounting bracket for filters, filters, storage tank (typically 2 – 3 gallons) and a R.O. drinking water faucet.

 

 Differences in Systems

There are two types of Reverse Osmosis membranes. The first is Cellulose Triacetate (CTA) and the second is Thin Film Composite (TFC). TFC membranes will filter out more containments then Cellulose Triacetate membranes. The downside to TFC membranes is that they degrade faster if it is in constant contact with chorine. By providing pre-filtering using Carbon resin, this will help reduce any potential issues with chlorine.

Reverse osmosis systems typically have 3 or more stages  which include the following: sediment filter (to help filter out water containments) carbon filter ( for taste and odor of water) and the Reverse Osmosis membrane which is tightly nit and wound to .0005 microns. This means that particulates, bacteria, and viruses are too big to pass through the membrane.